Research

Cardiac Signal Transduction and Cellular Biology Laboratory

Whether due to genetic, congenital, or acquired disease, the sick heart undergoes stereotypical changes, including excess growth of the pumping chambers and the laying down of scar tissue. A better understanding of the basic mechanisms underlying this “pathological remodeling” will result in the rationale design of new therapies to prevent or treat heart failure, the common end-stage of heart disease. The Cardiac Signal Transduction and Cellular Biology Laboratory at the University of Miami Miller School of Medicine is committed to the elucidation of the basic mechanisms that affect the heart in disease and the development of new treatments that will improve the survival and quality of life of heart patients.


Michael S. Kapiloff, MD, PhD, FAHA
Principal Investigator
Professor of Cardiology
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tel: 305-243-7863
fax: 305-243-3906

Mailing Address
P.O. Box 016960
Miami, FL 33101

Faculty:
Eliana C Martinez Valencia, MD, PhD
Research Assistant Professor
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Jinliang Li, PhD
Research Assistant Professor
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Wendou Yu, PhD
Research Assistant Professor
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Fellows:
Xiaofeng Li, PhD
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Boris Castillo Chabeco, Ph.D.,
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Technical Staff
Mr. Hrishikesh Thakur
Laboratory Manager
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Ms. Maria Cesareo
Technician
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The Kapiloff Laboratory is currently recruiting new post-doctoral fellows and students. Please feel free to contact Dr. Kapiloff directly.

There are currently two open postdoctoral associate positions in the Kapiloff laboratory – one regarding signal transduction in cardiac myocytes, the other signal transduction in neurons. A major focus of the lab has been the mAKAP scaffold protein that coordinates crosstalk between cAMP, calcium and MAP-kinase signaling pathways and that is important for the induction of myocyte hypertrophy and neuronal survival. A wide range of techniques are being used to address these questions including the biochemical analysis of recombinant proteins in vitro, culture of primary cardiac myocytes and hippocampal neurons, live cell imaging using novel FRET sensors and the analysis of genetically-modified mouse models. Qualified candidate must possess a PhD degree. Experience in molecular biology, biochemistry, and/or cell biology, including live cell fluorescent microscopy is preferable. Computer proficiency and database knowledge, strong analytical, organizational and communication skills are required. An appropriate combination of education, certifications, and/or relevant work experience will be considered.